Fashion Revolution Week

Thinking about who made my clothes for Fashion Revolution Week.

For most consumers buying clothes is about choice…

 What style suits me best? Which colour do I prefer? What is it made of? Which size is most flattering? How much will it cost?

 We ask ourselves any number of stylistic questions before arriving at a decision. But the question that is so often forgotten is who made it? Most of the time we don’t stop to ask what life is like for the 75 million people in the global apparel market or how much they are paid.

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This matters because as consumers we hold the power. Every purchase we make says something about what we value. Fashion Revolution week is about raising awareness and empowering individuals to change the way fashion works. By asking brands ‘Who made my clothes?’ we are part of a global movement demanding greater transparency in the fashion supply chain. This is an essential step for improving the lives of people across the fashion landscape, from cotton farmers to garment workers.

 What you can do…

  •  Pressure your favourite brands

Hold them to account for the social and environmental impact of their business. Share the label of a piece of clothing on social media and ask the brand #whomademyclothes?

  • Write to a Politician

Let them know the welfare of the planet and the people making your clothes matters to you.

  • Buy better

Choose fair-trade or second-hand where you can – even if this means buying something more expensive less often.

  • Repair, reinvent, revive

Instead of buying new, try updating something you already own.

Find out more here.

One thought on “Fashion Revolution Week”

  1. I bought a Walker Slater wool coat in Edinburgh 15 years ago. The lining wore out recently as I wore it constantly in winter. I literally loved it to bits! Rather than buy another coat I decided to get our local seamstress to reline it. It cost me £50 to get it mended but a new coat would cost over £300 and the style is no longer available. It will probably last me another 15-20 years so it makes economical sense to revive the clothes you love. Likewise with woollen jumpers elbow patches keep them going for a few more seasons.

    Great post Abi 🙂

    Like

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